OUR BLOG
Flossing is an essential part of any oral health care routine. The American Dental Association recommends flossing at least once a day to achieve optimal oral health. By flossing daily, you help remove plaque from the areas between your teeth where the toothbrush can't reach. This is important because plaque that is not removed by brushing and flossing can eventually harden into calculus or tartar. Flossing also helps prevent gum disease and cavities. When is the best time to floss? Before I brush or after? The most important thing about flossing is to do it. Pick a time of day when you can devote an extra couple of minutes to your dental care. People who are too tired at the end of the day may benefit from flossing first thing in the morning or flossing after lunch. And don’t forget, children need to floss too! You should be flossing your child’s teeth as soon as he or she has two teeth that touch. Because flossing demands more manual dexterity than very young children have, children are not usually able to floss well by themselves until they are age 10 or 11. Keep in mind that flossing should not be painful. You may feel discomfort when you first start flossing, but don’t give up. With daily brushing and flossing, that discomfort should ease within a week or two. If your pain persists, talk to your dentist. If you find flossing difficult, consider a different flossing method. People who have difficulty handling dental floss may prefer to use another kind of interdental cleaner such as a wooden plaque remover, dental pick or pre-threaded flosser. Ask your dentist how to use them properly to avoid injuring your gums. It could be that you simply need to try another type of dental floss—waxed, unwaxed, thick or comfort floss. Stick with it and you’ll have adopted a healthy habit for life. Schedule a consultation today with Dental Health Center.To request an appointment, contact Dental Health Center a general, cosmetic, periodontic, endodontic, and orthodontic dental practice located in Miami Lakes and Pembroke Pines.

Cavities, or tooth decay, is the destruction of your tooth enamel, the hard, outer layer of your teeth. It can be a problem for children, teens and adults. Plaque, a sticky film of bacteria, constantly forms on your teeth. When you eat or drink foods containing sugars, the bacteria in plaque produce acids that attack tooth enamel. The stickiness of the plaque keeps these acids in contact with your teeth and over time the enamel can break down. This is when cavities can form. A cavity is a little hole in your tooth.Cavities are more common among children, but changes that occur with aging make cavities an adult problem, too. Recession of the gums away from the teeth, combined with an increased incidence of gum disease, can expose tooth roots to plaque. Tooth roots are covered with cementum, a softer tissue than enamel. They are susceptible to decay and are more sensitive to touch and to hot and cold. It’s common for people over age 50 to have tooth-root decay.Decay around the edges, or a margin, of fillings is also common for older adults. Because many older adults lacked benefits of fluoride and modern preventive dental care when they were growing up, they often have a number of dental fillings. Over the years, these fillings may weaken and tend to fracture and leak around the edges. Bacteria accumulate in these tiny crevices causing acid to build up which leads to decay.You can help prevent tooth decay by following these tips:

  • Brush twice a day with a fluoride toothpaste.
  • Clean between your teeth daily with floss or interdental cleaner.
  • Eat nutritious and balanced meals and limit snacking.
  • Check with your dentist about the use of supplemental fluoride, which strengthens your teeth, and about use of dental sealants (a plastic protective coating) applied to the chewing surfaces of the back teeth (where decay often starts) to protect them from decay.
  • Visit your dentist regularly for professional cleanings and oral examination. 

Schedule a consultation today with Dental Health Center.To request an appointment, contact Dental Health Center a general, cosmetic, periodontic, endodontic, and orthodontic dental practice located in Miami Lakes and Pembroke Pines. 

Root canal therapy is a treatment used to repair and save a tooth that is badly decayed or infected.A root canal procedure is performed when the nerve of the tooth becomes infected or the pulp becomes damaged. During a root canal procedure, the nerve and pulp are removed, and the inside of the tooth is cleaned and sealed.Root canal procedures have the reputation of being painful. Actually, most people report that the procedure itself is no more painful than having a filling placed. The discomfort experienced in the period leading up to seeking dental care is truly painful, not the root canal procedure itself.What Is Dental Pulp?The pulp or pulp chamber is the soft area within the center of the tooth. The tooth's nerve lies within root canals, which lie within the roots or "legs" of the tooth. The root canals travel from the tip of the tooth's root into the pulp chamber, which also contains blood vessels and connective tissue that nourish the tooth.A tooth's nerve is not vitally important to a tooth's health and function after the tooth has emerged through the gums. Its only function is sensory -- to provide the sensation of heat or cold. The presence or absence of a nerve will not affect the day-to-day functioning of the tooth.Why Does the Pulp Need to Be Removed?When nerve tissue or pulp is damaged, it breaks down, and bacteria begin to multiply within the pulp chamber. The bacteria and other decayed debris can cause an infection or ab. An abscessed is a pus-filled pocket that forms at the end of a tooth’s root. In addition to an abscess, an infection in the root canal of a tooth can cause:

  • Swelling that may spread to other areas of the face, neck, or head
  • Bone loss around the tip of the root
  • Drainage problems extending outward from the root. A hole can occur through the side of the tooth, with drainage into the gums or through the cheek into the skin.

What Damages a Tooth's Nerve and Pulp in the First Place?A tooth's nerve and pulp can become irritated, inflamed, and infected due to deep decay, repeated dental procedures on a tooth, large fillings, a crack or chip in the tooth, or trauma to the face.What Are the Signs That Root Canal Therapy Is Needed?Signs you may need root canal therapy include:

  • Severe toothache pain upon chewing or application of pressure
  • Prolonged sensitivity (pain) to hot or cold temperatures (after the heat or cold has been removed)
  • Discoloration (darkening) of the tooth
  • Swelling and tenderness in nearby gums
  • A persistent or recurring pimple on the gums

Sometimes no symptoms are present.

The Root Canal Procedure.The root canal procedure requires one or more office visits and can be performed by a dentist or endodontist. An endodontist is a dentist who specializes in the causes, diagnosis, prevention, and treatment of diseases and injuries of the human dental pulp or the nerve of the tooth. The choice of which type of dentist to use depends to some degree on the difficulty of the root canal procedure needed in your particular tooth and the general dentist's comfort level in working on your tooth. Your dentist will discuss who might be best suited to perform the work in your particular case.The first step in the procedure is to take an X-ray to see the shape of the root canals and determine if there are any signs of infection in the surrounding bone. Your dentist or endodontist will then use local anesthesia to numb the area near the tooth. Actually, anesthesia may not be necessary, since the nerve is dead, but most dentists still anesthetize the area to make the patient more relaxed and at ease.Next, to keep the area dry and free of saliva during treatment, your dentist will place a rubber dam (a sheet of rubber) around the tooth access hole will then be drilled into the tooth. The pulp, along with bacteria, the decayed nerve tissue, and related debris, is removed from the tooth. The cleaning-out process is accomplished using root canal files. A series of these files of increasing diameter are each subsequently placed into the access hole and worked down the full length of the tooth to scrape and scrub the sides of the root canals. Water or sodium hypochlorite is used periodically to flush away the debris.Once the tooth is thoroughly cleaned, it needs to be sealed. Some dentists like to wait a week before sealing the tooth. For instance, if there is an infection, your dentist may put a medication inside the tooth to clear it up. Others may choose to seal the tooth the same day it is cleaned out. If the root canal is not completed on the same day, a temporary filling is placed in the exterior hole in the tooth to keep contaminants out between appointments.At the next appointment, to fill the interior of the tooth, a sealer paste and a rubber compound called gutta-percha are placed into the tooth's root canal. To fill the exterior access hole created at the beginning of treatment, a filling is placed.The final step may involve further restoration of the tooth. Because a tooth that needs root canal therapy often is one that has a large filling or extensive decay or other weakness, a crown, crown and post, or other restoration often needs to be placed on the tooth to protect it, prevent it from breaking, and restore it to full function. Your dentist will discuss the need for any additional dental work with you.Schedule a consultation today with Dental Health Center.To request an appointment, contact Dental Health Center a general, cosmetic, periodontic, endodontic, and orthodontic dental practice located in Miami Lakes and Pembroke Pines. 

Dental bonding is a procedure in which a tooth-colored resin material (a durable plastic material) is applied and hardened with a special light, which ultimately "bonds" the material to the tooth to restore or improve person's smile.

For What Conditions Is Dental Bonding Considered?Dental bonding is an option that can be considered:

  • To repair decayed teeth (composite resins are used to fill cavities)
  • To repair chipped or cracked teeth
  • To improve the appearance of discolored teeth
  • To close spaces between teeth
  • To make teeth look longer
  • To change the shape of teeth
  • As a cosmetic alternative to amalgam fillings
  • To protect a portion of the tooth's root that has been exposed when gums recede

What's the Procedure for Having a Tooth Bonded?

  • Preparation. Little advance preparation is needed for dental bonding. Anesthesia is often not necessary unless the bonding is being used to fill a decayed tooth. Your dentist will use a shade guide to select a composite resin color that will closely match the color of your tooth.
  • The bonding process. Next, the surface of the tooth will be roughened and a conditioning liquid applied. These procedures help the bonding material adhere to the tooth. The tooth-colored, putty-like resin is then applied, molded, and smoothed to the desired shape. An ultraviolet light or laser is then used to harden the material. After the material is hardened, your dentist will further trim and shape it, and polish it to match the sheen of the rest of the tooth surface.
  • Time-to-completion. Dental bonding takes about 30 to 60 minutes per tooth to complete.

What Are the Advantages and Disadvantages of Dental Bonding?

  • Advantages: Dental bonding is among the easiest and least expensive of cosmetic dental procedures. Unlike veneers and crowns, which are customized tooth coverings that must be manufactured in a lab, bonding usually can be done in one office visit unless several teeth are involved. Another advantage, compared with veneers and crowns, is that the least amount of tooth enamel is removed. Also, unless dental bonding is being performed to fill a cavity, anesthesia is usually not required.
  • Disadvantages: Although the material used in dental bonding is somewhat stain resistant, it does not resist stains as well as crowns. Another disadvantage is that the bonding materials do not last as long nor are as strong as other restorative procedures, such as crowns, veneers, or fillings. Additionally, bonding materials can chip and break off the tooth.

Because of some of the limitations of dental bonding, some dentists view it as best suited for small cosmetic changes, for temporary correction of cosmetic defects, and for correction of teeth in areas of very low bite pressure (for example, front teeth). Consult with your dentist about the best cosmetic approach for your particular problem.Schedule a consultation today with Dental Health Center.To request an appointment, contact Dental Health Center a general, cosmetic, periodontic, endodontic, and orthodontic dental practice located in Miami Lakes and Pembroke Pines. 

What is tooth decay?Tooth decay  is damage that occurs when germs (bacteria) in your mouth make acids that eat away at a tooth. It can lead to a hole in the tooth, called a cavity. If not treated, tooth decay can cause pain, infection, and tooth loss.A tooth  has three layers.
  • The hard outer layer is called enamel.
  • The middle layer is called dentin.
  • The center of the tooth is called the pulp. It contains nerves and blood vessels.
The more layers that are affected by decay, the worse the damage.What causes tooth decay?Bacteria and food can cause tooth decay. A clear, sticky substance called plaque is always forming on your teeth and gums. Plaque contains bacteria that feed on the sugars in the food you eat.As the bacteria feed, they make acids. The acids attack the teeth for 20 minutes or more after you eat. Over time, these acids destroy tooth enamel, causing tooth decay.Things that make you more likely to have tooth decay include:
  • Not brushing and flossing your teeth regularly and not seeing a dentist for checkups and cleanings.
  • Eating foods that are high in sugar and other carbohydrates, which feed the bacteria in your mouth.
  • Not getting enough fluoride. Fluoride helps prevent tooth decay by making teeth more resistant to acids produced by plaque. Fluoride is added to many public water supplies.
  • Not having enough saliva. Saliva washes away food and harmful sugars, so it helps protect your teeth from decay. A dry mouth may be caused by a condition such as xerostomia or Sjögren's syndrome, by taking certain medicines, or by breathing through your mouth. Older adults are more likely to have a dry mouth.
  • Having diabetes.
  • Smoking, using spit (smokeless) tobacco, or breathing secondhand smoke.
Children, whose teeth are still growing, are more likely than adults to have tooth decay. This is because the minerals in new teeth are not very strong and are easier for acids to eat away.Even babies can be at risk for tooth decay. Babies who are put to bed with a bottle can get "bottle mouth "—tooth decay caused by the sugar in milk, formula, or juice. Babies aren't born with decay-causing bacteria in their mouths. But they can get bacteria from adults who share spoons, forks, or other utensils with them.What are the symptoms?Tooth decay usually doesn't cause symptoms until you have a cavity or an infected tooth. When this happens, you may have:
  • A toothache, which is the most common symptom.
  • Swelling in your gums near a sore tooth. This can be a sign of severe tooth decay or an abscessed tooth 
  • Bad breath or a bad taste in your mouth.
  • White, gray, brown, or black spots on your teeth.
If you have a toothache, see a dentist. Sometimes the pain will go away for a while, but the tooth decay will keep growing. If you don't get treatment, your cavities could get worse and your tooth could die.How is tooth decay diagnosed?To diagnose tooth decay, your dentist will:
  • Ask questions about your past dental and medical problems and care.
  • Check your teeth, using a pointed tool and a small mirror.
  • Take X-rays of your teeth and mouth to find tooth decay that can't be seen with the eyes alone.
How is it treated?The best treatment for tooth decay depends on how severe it is. If tooth decay is caught early, before a cavity forms, you may be able to stop it by brushing with fluoride toothpaste or getting fluoride treatments. That's one good reason to see your dentist on a regular basis.If the decay has eaten through the enamel, you may need one or more of these treatments:
  • filling if a cavity has formed. After the decay is removed, the dentist uses a material to fill the hole and restore the tooth to its original shape.
  • crown if the decay is severe and your tooth is badly damaged. A crown, or cap, is a man-made replacement for part of a tooth.
  • root canal if the pulp of your tooth is infected. A root canal removes the diseased pulp of a tooth.
  • Removal (extraction) if the root of the tooth is severely damaged. The dentist may replace the tooth with a bridge  or an implant.
If you have pain and swelling, you can take steps at home to relieve it.
  • Use ice or cold packs on the outside of your cheek for 10 to 15 minutes at a time, several times a day. Always put a thin cloth between the ice and your skin. Don't use heat.
  • Take an over-the-counter pain reliever such as acetaminophen or ibuprofen. Be safe with medicines. Read and follow all instructions on the label.
Schedule a consultation today with Dental Health Center.To request an appointment, contact Dental Health Center a general, cosmetic, periodontic, endodontic, and orthodontic dental practice located in Miami Lakes and Pembroke Pines. 
Smoking leads to dental problems, including:
  • Bad Breath
  • Tooth discoloration
  • Inflammation of the salivary gland openings on the roof of the mouth
  • Increased build up of plaque and tartar on the teeth
  • Increased loss of bone within the jaw
  • Increased risk of leukoplakia, white patches inside the mouth
  • Increased risk of developing gum disease, a leading cause of tooth loss
  • Delayed healing process following tooth extraction, periodontal treatment, or oral surgery
  • Lower success rate of dental implant procedures
  • Increased risk of developing oral cancer.

 

How Does Smoking Lead to Gum Disease? Smoking and other tobacco products can lead to gum disease by affecting the attachment of bone and soft tissue to your teeth. More specifically, it appears that smoking interferes with the normal function of gum tissue cells. This interference makes smokers more susceptible to infections, such as periodontal disease, and also seems to impair blood flow to the gums - which may affect wound healing.
Schedule a consultation today with Dental Health Center.To request an appointment, contact Dental Health Center a general, cosmetic, periodontic, endodontic, and orthodontic dental practice located in Miami Lakes and Pembroke Pines. 

Connect With Us Today

Follow us in our social Network and find out about the last news, events and promotions of Dental Health Center.